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Ten-year cancer survival rates doubled since the 70s

cancer survival

The ten-year survival rate for people with cancer has doubled since the early 70s, according to new figures.

Currently, more than 170,000 people who were diagnosed in the 70s and 80s are still alive in the UK, according to Macmillan Cancer Support’s report Cancer: Then And Now.

The report puts the increase down to better treatment and an ageing population. But there is still a huge variation in survival rates between cancer types.

Living with side effects

The negative side effect to this is the burden it places on the UK’s health system, as people are living longer with the side effects of cancer.

These can include painful lower-leg swelling in women following breast cancer to emotional trauma and incontinence.

Around 625,000 people are facing poor health or disability after their treatment for cancer.

Macmillan estimates there could be around 42,500 people diagnosed with cancer in the 70s and 80s who may still be dealing with such consequences.

And it’s expected that the number of people living with cancer is set to grow from 2.5 million people to four million by 2030 in the UK.

Better communication needed

The report also calls for better communication with cancer patients as around 116,000 patients in England didn’t have the long-term side effects fully explained to them.

Macmillan chief executive Lynda Thomas says that people now live a better life with their cancer than in the past.

But the number of people coming in and out of treatment is putting pressure on the NHS, she adds.

  

All news is provided by the Press Association in collaboration with Ramsay Healthcare.
Please note that all copy above is © Press Association and does not reflect views or opinions of Ramsay Healthcare unless explicitly stated.
Additional comments on the page from individual consultants do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of other consultants or Ramsay Healthcare.

The ten-year survival rate for people with cancer has doubled since the early 70s, according to new figures.

 

Currently, more than 170,000 people who were diagnosed in the 70s and 80s are still alive in the UK, according to Macmillan Cancer Support’s report Cancer: Then And Now.

The report puts the increase down to better treatment and an ageing population. But there is still a huge variation in survival rates between cancer types.

Living with side effects

The negative side effect to this is the burden it places on the UK’s health system, as people are living longer with the side effects of cancer.

These can include painful lower-leg swelling in women following breast cancer to emotional trauma and incontinence.

Around 625,000 people are facing poor health or disability after their treatment for cancer.

Macmillan estimates there could be around 42,500 people diagnosed with cancer in the 70s and 80s who may still be dealing with such consequences.

And it’s expected that the number of people living with cancer is set to grow from 2.5 million people to four million by 2030 in the UK.

Better communication needed

The report also calls for better communication with cancer patients as around 116,000 patients in England didn’t have the long-term side effects fully explained to them.

Macmillan chief executive Lynda Thomas says that people now live a better life with their cancer than in the past.

But the number of people coming in and out of treatment is putting pressure on the NHS, she adds.

All news is provided by the Press Association in collaboration with Ramsay Healthcare.

Please note that all copy above is © Press Association and does not reflect views or opinions of Ramsay Healthcare unless explicitly stated.

Additional comments on the page from individual consultants do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of other consultants or Ramsay Healthcare.

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