Tummy tuck could help reduce back pain and incontinence

Tummy Tuck Could Help Reduce Back Pain and Incontinence

tummy-tuck-help-back-pain

A study has found that women who have a tummy tuck after having children can find it reduces back pain and urinary incontinence.

The results suggest that although abdominoplasty is classified as a cosmetic procedure, it can also improve medical issues as well.

Tighten stomach muscles

A tummy tuck (‘abdominoplasty’) is primarily carried out to tighten the stomach muscles and remove loose skin and fat. It makes the abdomen flatter and more toned. A common reason for having a tummy tuck is when women are looking to restore the appearance of their abdomen after having children.

An abdominoplasty is relatively straightforward and there are different types of procedure, depending on how much excess skin and fat needs to be removed.

Back pain and bladder control

Researchers from Wolters Kluwer Health carried out a study of 214 women who had tummy tuck procedures at nine plastic surgery centres in Australia. The average age of the women was 42 and, on average, they had had 2.5 child births.

The women were asked to complete questionnaires before and have their surgery, which included questions about the level of back pain and urinary incontinence (loss of bladder control), and how it impacted their lives. Both back pain and urinary incontinence are common problems following child birth.

Improvement in physical issues

Before their surgery, 51% of the women had moderate to severe disability from back pain, and 42.5% had significant concern about urinary incontinence.

Six months after their tummy tuck procedure, only 9% of the women still had moderate disability from back pain, and less than 2% said urinary incontinence was still a significant problem.

The results were similar regardless of the type of abdominoplasty the women had, and scores for back pain continued to improve from six weeks to six months (whereas urinary incontinence remained the same after six months as after six weeks).

Functional benefit

The authors of the study – the results of which were published in the journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery – said that their research showed that abdominoplasty has “a proven functional benefit as well as a cosmetic benefit”.

It is believed these functional improvements may be due to the restored strength and stability in the abdomen and pelvic region that the procedure provides.

 

This article was written by a third party source and does not reflect the views or opinions of Ramsay Health Care unless explicitly stated.

Additional comments on the page from individual Consultants do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of other Consultants or Ramsay Health Care.

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